Your 24 hours. Time management or How to get to know yourself while organizing your life. Part II

Today, I am yet again happy to present the second part of the latest LaTeX Noob guest post:

 

Last time, I told you about four important steps to organizing your life. They were:

  1. Know your priorities.
  2. Learn to say “no”.
  3. Leave your comfort zone.
  4. Never back down.

If you want to re-read the last post, you can find it here!

So, time management.

You will need a calendar, let’s start with that. Take your phone, open your Google calendar. Start. It is actually that easy. You have to know the most important basics. When do I work, what are my main working hours? Do I like a silent or slightly more lively environment for my work? Am I a morning person or a night owl? When will I need a break, when do I want to go to sleep?

When am I meeting my friends, when do I spend time with my partner or my family? What do I do for relaxing? How often? Exercise? Any activities? When and where?

What is there to do on household chores (you know, cooking, cleaning, gardening etc.) and when are they due?

Just write those things down. Think about it. It is creepy at first sight, I know, but hey…

Labyrinth-Girl

I am a morning person, I like to start early with my work.

I love good instrumental or orchestral music during work. I like other people around me while I work, because of the swift “office-noise”.

For relaxing, I like reading, listening to music, going climbing, watching TV, taking long walks, photography, writing, people-stuff (friends and family).

Basic week:

  • 4 work days, Monday to Thursday = 30 hours of work
  • 1 “thesis day” (also called somehow home-office)
  • 1 university course to teach and prepare
  • 4 university courses to attend and prepare
  • one evening to go climbing
  • (at least) one evening to have dinner with my partner

An example week

I will give you my five days of my working week in my calendar now, just as an example and to show you how I work on my organization and how I try to plan my days. You may have got it until now – it is all about your own rhythm: find it, then stick to it.

Monday

7:00 start work

15:00 short coffee break with friends

17:00 back home, dinner

18:15 climbing (1.5 to 2 h)

  • hair day, bathroom cleaning

  • prepare courses

22:00 bedtime

Tuesday

7:00 start work

10:00 Coffee break with colleagues

18:00 back home, dinner

  • washing clothes

  • prepare courses

  • TV/Dinnertime with my partner

22:00 bedtime

Wednesday

7:00 start work

10:00 teach my university class

12:00 lunch with friends

15:15 university course 1

18:45 university course 2

20:30 dinner with colleagues

22:00 back home

23:00 bedtime

Thursday

7:00 start work

13:00 end work

13:30 university course 3

15:00 prepare next course (learning a new language for work)

17:00 university course 4

19:00 back home

22:00 bedtime

Friday

7:00 morning routine

  • Thesis Day

  • kitchen cleaning

  • washing clothes

  • shopping supplies

14:00 lunch with my partner

15:00 beginning of my pre-weekend

Weekend

Normally spend with family and/or friends and /or partner – and sometimes spent with reading texts or papers connected to my research field

Conclusion

So I actually do have some kind of private life, but I have to organize it in a very strict way and I have to be very strict with myself sometimes. I am a morning person and I am in the possession of a “daylight alarm clock” – you know, it starts with deep red light approximately one hour before your actual alarm time and continues getting brighter like the sun rising, so your body can wake up before you actively open your eyes and wake up in your head. It works! At least, for me.

I need my bedtime set earlier now, so around 10 pm I am really grateful for a warm and cozy bed and sleep. I enjoy resting in my bed on the weekend, this is a fact, but it is like a reward I promise to myself.

I am still meeting my friends and I have still a lot of other things to do in my life, things which I enjoy and which are keeping me relaxed and sane.

It’s worth the hard work. You just have to start.

Advertisements

Riding higher waves

At the risk of boring you all with my frequent thoughts on better teaching, I wanted to give you another metaphor on good teaching, inspired by a surfing class I took. To sum it all up, surfing was great fun. But this year, I was a bit unfortunate to get teachers who were a lot worse than the ones I’d had previously. The high waves and the shallow water make for good metaphors for the basics and the advanced topcis I frequently drone on about in my philosophy of teaching well. So, there you go.

The shallows and the high waves

The teachers were over-protective of us in the shallow waters. They helped more than we would have needed help and thereby, didn’t teach us to act independently. I wanted to do so, but it was not encouraged and we weren’t given any instructions on how to catch a wave on our own. They wouldn’t even let us paddle onto the wave ourselves, but rather pushed the board for us. This might seem very nice and thoughtful. At least, that’s how I felt at first.

But then, once we got to the higher waves – waves high enough for me to find them somewhat scary and thus, distract me quite a bit – they hardly helped at all! But since they had been so overprotective with the basics, doing everything for us, I didn’t have a feeling for how to catch a wave on my own. And this doesn’t exactly get any easier when you are panicked by the high waves. The more difficult situation we got thrown into all of a sudden made it difficult to think clearly, let alone grasp a skill on my own which no one had explained to me beforehand. The deep water is not a place to learn the basics. They should have told us those in shallow water. I think this is a very good analogy for teaching since this is exactly what happens in many classes as well. And then the teachers act like you’re an idiot for not being able to figure out the difficult stuff on your own. Because “that’s just what you do and we all had to learn it the hard way”. But really, this means that the teachers are not doing their jobs and there’s no excuse for that. Don’t blame your failings as a teacher on your students! Don’t turn your lack of teaching competence into a ‘character building’ opportunity for your students. This will not make them better people. It makes you a worse person. And a teacher I would fire on the spot if I were in the position to do so.

Don’t excuse your bad teaching as being a ‘character building’ opportunity

This is very apparent in technology classes at technical universities. In the class, you get this ridiculously simple mini example which is so easy that everybody understands it rightaway. Subsequently, teachers go on to over-explain this for 10 minutes. All students, by now, are lured into a false sense of security because the example was easy. Then they set the task for the assigment and it’s 500% more difficult than the example. This, they pretend, is a learning progression. Hint from someone who actually is a qualified teacher and has experience with training with a systematic progression in sports: No, don’t be ridiculous. This is not a progression. A progression challenges you but doesn’t set tasks which are practically impossible to achieve with the basics training provided beforehand. A progressions means setting a challenging, but doable task – not a sink or swim experience. In these programming classes, usually only those survive who had more knowledge beforehand, came from schools where they’d had years of programming practice, or else, they had more advanced friends or relatives who agreed to help them.

This creates the illusion for teachers that the class is actually doable if you’re willing to put in the work. This is a joke. If you pretend to be a teacher whatsoever, your class should be understandable without help from relatives who are experienced programmers! In some of the classes, I even read all the suggested introductory books and 2-3 more but the class was still difficult because you had to look up hundreds of programming libraries and so on. I managed because I worked hard and had some emergency help from more experienced friends. Having to look up stuff is normal in programming, of course. But as a seasoned programmer, you already know what to search for and know where the new information fits into your previous knowledge. A newbie can’t – I repeat – can’t know that. Don’t blame them for your lack of understanding of how learning works!

Maybe it’s a mistake so many people teach at universities who have never gone through teacher’s training. That is not to say that teacher’s training only produces great teachers. We all know that, sadly, it doesn’t. But at least people necessarily have heard about how learning is supposed to work in theory. Having teachers who do not know nor care how learning and teaching is supposed to work should not be allowed. Yet this is the norm at universities. Students are lucky to come across a natural every once in a while. But it is no coincidence self-help gurus stress the importance of mentors: Not to say that you couldn’t learn it on your own. But your results are just going to be a million times better and faster if you happen to come across a good teacher.

Clear instructions for the ‘danger zones’

Danger zones provide excellent opportunities for accelerated learning progress. But especially before being thrown into ‘dangerous situations’ the students are barely qualified to handle at their stage, giving out clear instructions is crucial. With the guidance of a good teacher and very, very clear instructions of what they should or shouldn’t do, treating students to  a difficult challenge will greatly speed up the learning process. If not done well, however, it will be a nightmarish experience which might even end up deterring students from going on with their studies!

Having something like a life line or a safeboat might be enough to circumvent this. Or having more time or trainers to guide students as much as needed. Don’t rush into these situations without carefully planning them. Students need thoughtful teachers who are there to help students when they need it. Maybe even teachers who anticipate pitfalls students are running into because they can’t know themselves due to lack of experience. If you don’t have a lot of means to make this experience as good as possible, use the one most important element: very clear instructions and some abundant background information before you start. It is also important that students understand why certain rules or behaviours are imposed on them or why certain actions might be dangerous. You can always limit the scariness scope of an overly taxing situations by limiting choices and options through clear instructions and rules. Reduce the scope of a problem and you’ll make success much more achieveable.

Another experience from surfing was on this utmost importance of clear instructions, especially with difficult tasks. On a side note, to avoid any confusion: Surfing was a lot of fun overall, not to give a misleading impression, I just wanted to use the opportunity to point out some interesting observations on teaching. Anyway. In the high waves, the teachers hardly took any notice of me at all. As a novice, I had a hard time paddling against the force of the high waves and was constantly being carried away by the current. I was busy remembering where I was and keeping a vague orientation by looking for where the teachers were. Now was the time when I would have needed their help they had so over-abundantly and unnecessarily given to me in the shallows. I didn’t know whether I should just take the next wave I deemed ok (how the hell should I know which wave is ok? But anyway…) or if I should wait for the teacher to make that choice for me, which they had previously done most of the time.

In this difficult situation, however, they made no clear announcement of what I should do and when they took notice of me after I had spent almost 10 minutes paddling against the waves and waiting around for directions from them, both teachers gave me conflicting instructions. They told me to come over to them but my arms were so weak from paddling and the waves had gotten pretty violent, so it wasn’t easy for me to get to them. Then they decided I had drifted off too much and should just carefully get out of the water. I was shocked. Had I just wasted so much of my energy and didn’t even get one wave to ride? The situation had not only drained the physical energy of my arms and the heat out of my body, it had also drained me emotionally since there was no reward for putting in the effort. Afterwards, I sat on the beach resting a little bit and felt that I didn’t really want to get back in at all. I had lost my trust in the teachers. What if they’d let me rot out there in the waves again? I already didn’t have much energy left. Also I didn’t want the emotional blow of having to get back out again without getting one single wave. Maybe I was just tired, cold and stressing about the situation too much. But then again, I think this is exactly how most students feel when taught difficult subjects. They are left alone at sea in conditions nobody prepared them for. 

Just a thought for now 😉

Best,
the Ninja

PS: Oh, and my experience would probably be a starting point of discussion on multiple teachers who are teaching overlapping topics in parallel but contradict themselves. But that’s a topic for another time…

 

Buy me coffee!

If my content has helped you, donate 3€ to buy me coffee. Thanks a lot, I appreciate it!

€3.00

Improve Your Teaching – 10 Simple Tricks

As you might know, good teaching is important to me, so I wanted to share ten simple tricks which I think can improve your teaching. Most of them are about making sure people get the basics which, in my opinion, is one of the biggest mistakes people make in teaching. Let’s get straight at it.

1) Make sure the preliminaries are clear before starting an explanation.

If they are not, don’t even bother starting on the explanation, it will be a complete waste of time. Even if this means that you will spend the whole lesson bringing them up-to-date with the preliminaries and you won’t be able to start on the actual topic at all. Make time for this prep work or risk that all of your subsequent explanations will not get through. To find out if the preliminaries and basics are not clear, you might have to plan testing your students regularly (at the start of each block), like with the basics (see nr. 3).

2) Don’t just “get through with the material”.

Teaching is not about you doing what you had planned, but about students learning something. If you misjudged their previous knowledge, change your plan. Bring them up-to-date. That way, they will have learned something (and thus you have reached to goal of teaching), even if you end up not even being able to start on your actual topic at all. Would you rather be “done” with everything you had planned but nobody understood anything or rather do 1/3 of what you had planned to do but be sure that students really master it? I would much rather go with the latter. Or the result will be that your class will not have made any lasting impression on the students at all. Don’t let them leave the way they came!

3) Nothing is more important than absolute mastery of the basics.

Nothing. I repeat: Nothing.

I often find teachers go over the basics way too fast without ever checking if the students got it, because they think it obvious. Students also often don’t even realize their lacking understanding of the basics because they seem so simple. But really, what is the difference between an amateur and a professional musician? It’s not that the professional plays more advanced pieces, since the amateur can do that too after some time. But they are still no a professional, right? – That’s because mastery lies in perfecting the basics and total immerson, not skimming as much advanced stuff as possible without ever mastering anything. A professional musician spends more time doing drills on the basics – and you hear the difference immediately. Once you’re good, you can always learn more complicated advanced stuff and go on studying independently. But you will have a hard time improving on your own if you’ve never even mastered the basics. 

No matter how friendly you are, they are unlikely to tell you what they don’t understand, especially admit to not having understood the material you have spent the last three weeks talking about. You can, of course, scream at them for being lazy or stupid. But no matter how you react, this will not change the fact that they did not get the basics, so any further teaching of more difficult matters or, in fact, anything which forms a progression building on these basics, is going to be time lost and nothing else. Yes, the good ones will make it. But please, don’t just settle for that.

Put a crazy dedication to everyone getting the basics, so at least you can tell yourself “at least they all have the basics now” after the class. You don’t want to overhear your colleagues going on about what horrible teacher your students had last year and have to admit it was you who couldn’t even teach them the basics. Apart from that, test because it has been proven to be the most effective method for learning and also, your students might not even realize they don’t master the basics and therefore, can’t give you a truthful answer when you ask whether they already have the basics. Ultimately, only testing can tell. Hand them a worksheet for “repetition” of the basics with multiple tasks of progressing difficulty to work on on their own. Then walk around and help everyone. Most effective method to check up on your teaching success by far, in my experience.

(When doing this, act like a coach. Don’t give the impression of testing anyone and don’t grade this or they probably can’t enjoy it in the future. I don’t want that sort of pressure in my classes. Grading is for the final portfolio they hand in, not the learning process where we want them to make as many mistakes as possible! I sometimes use anonymous Google Forms so I can see whether the class overall has a good grasp on concepts but they are sure not to be graded since it’s anonymous. Also a great method of getting feedback throughout the semester, not just at the end.)

Also, I suggest you encourage students to go over the basics again every once in a while and with every stage of their progress. You see them differently each time and taking the time to repeat them is always worth it, especially if you want to really master something.

4) Test. Don’t assume learners learned anything before you’ve ascertained it through multiple tests.

This is not meant in a condescending way. Testing is proven to be the most effective learning technique (“learning types” are not scientifically valid – see the audiobook The Great Courses / The Learning Brain for details). Only once you’ve tested you really know what students already know. Often you realize that you already lost them before your first word because you stepped in too late. They might not even have reached the starting point of your explanation. These problems, however, are difficult to spot since usually in these cases, students don’t even know what they didn’t understand and cannot verbalize it when you ask.

5) Avoid confusing naming in programming.

This is not as trivial as it sounds. It might even be pretty difficult to put yourself in a learner’s position and choose a name which is not confusing or misleading. But all the more crucial to take the time to think about it.

For a student who doesn’t fully grasp the concept of how variables  work, what types and instances are, or classes and objects, this can be very detrimental and make learning so much more difficult. In failed teaching attempts in programming, bad naming is mostly the major culprit. Right after that comes the failure to reduce complexity and purge unnecessary detail. Choose names wisely. They make or break you explanation.

6)  Make sure you always only teach one new concept at once.

It happens far too easily that you explain three things at once without realizing. This also happens when you include unnessary detail which might contain concepts students are unfamilar with and end up confusing them, even though this wasn’t even what you were trying to explain.

7) When explaining something, remove the unnecessary.

Putting didactical reduction into practice means get rid of every detail which is not absolutely crucial to understanding the point or students will get confused by the multiple concepts and not see the point at all.

Also, try to eliminate all sorts of examples which might build on extra knowledge your students might not have (like in 6, be sure you really only teach one new concept). So, you might want to use an example of a historical situation which is completely familiar to you (in your crazy scientific surroundings). But are you sure your students are familiar with it? When explaining something new, not only reduce what’s new but also make sure to keep other potentially confusing artefacts out of the explanation. Maybe it wasn’t even that they didn’t understand the new concept – they already got hung up on the ingenious illustrative example you assumed would be totally logical to them. Don’t assume previous knowledge. At least reduce to a bare minimum. Just in case.

8) Always repeat what is important.

While this might be clear to you, for a student “everything” seems important. And all is new. They cannot tell what is important yet. It is your job to triage here! That’s why I really miss handout culture. There, you had the summary of the gist of a lesson. Now it’s just slides, but the slides usually don’t give you much of a clue about what is essential and what can be discarded. If students have to do the guesswork on their own here, they will waste a lot of time and maybe fail altogether. It’s definitely part of your job to help them out here. Take the time to make a summary for them for later reference. Don’t assume they can do that themselves or else they are lazy. Appreciate that you already know what’s important and therefore, have it easy to sum it all up. After all, you planned this lesson and you know what’s most important to you that they should take away from it, right? Just write it down and they can use the additional time to memorize. (Yeah, of course, they might also just not pay attention to anything else anymore. Find a way of doing this without self-sabotaging your classes.

9) Help them help themselves.

Often teachers get annoyed that students are very dependant and don’t know how to find out something by themselves. But ask yourself, did you ever explain them how to do it? Ironically, students depend on you to teach them how to be independent.

10) Nothing is obvious.

Rule of thumb: It’s highly likely you lost your students about 3 steps earlier than you think where you lost them.

That’s it. Hope it helps!

Have a great Sunday!

Buy me coffee!

If my content has helped you, donate 3€ to buy me coffee. Thanks a lot, I appreciate it!

€3.00

Hipster CV – A Template

Dear all,

sorry you haven’t been hearing from me so much lately. It’s been quite busy. To make it up to you, I wanted to share my hipster CV template on this occasion 😉 I will probably explain it later and also probably modify it in a way that it’s easiert to use for a beginner. If you want to use it and but don’t feel comfortable with how the template works, just check where the text you are looking to replace is in the main.tex and replace it with your content. That way, you should get away with fairly limited LaTeX skills and still be able to use the template if you want it.

hipster-cv

 

It is available on the newly created LaTeX Ninja Github! The template is not exactly the same as shown in the Teaser: LaTeX Resumé Template Preview.

hipster-cv-github

 

So you can look forward to more versions which will be kind of the same style. But I now have so many different elements that I could fill at least 10 different CV templates. Since I didn’t want to fall victim to my own perfectionism, I dedided to share the template now even though it could probably be better. It also doesn’t really comply with my own standards regarding good code, etc. 😉 Well, you can’t always have it all.

It is, however, more of a Saturday afternoon fun thing I did. I won’t give any recommendations as to whether it will be considered as appropriate in your field of work to actually use this CV 😉

Also, I hope I am allowed to have the Jack Sparrow images in the example. I am not so sure about it however. Come visit me in prison if this should go wrong 😉

Buy me coffee!

If my content has helped you, donate 3€ to buy me coffee. Thanks a lot, I appreciate it!

€3.00

Floating minipages and other wizardry

Inspired by a current issue from my friend the LaTeX Noob, I wanted to give a short explanation on how you can combine floats (i.e. figures) and minipages. Why should you care? Well, if you need tikzpicture or images placed besides eachother or beside text. So most people will probably need this at some point 😉 A great resource is the WikiBook, as always. If you want the lengthy account – that’s the way to go. For everybody else, an explanation of my own.

Floats and non-floating boxes

What are floats?

Some fundamental explanations first: A figure is a float. A minipage is not a float but a box which sits at its fixed place. These are two fundamentally different things. When you combine them in a bad way, LaTeX might get fed up at this. So when planning your minipaging or floating situation, ask yourself which effects are really important to you and which aren’t.

Do I even need a float?

A float will self-regulate positioning pretty much. If you need this feature, you need a float. But maybe this is a behaviour you explicitly don’t want anyway. Then maybe you don’t even need a float at all. Beginners often get confused and think they need to use figures everywhere but, strictly speaking, you don’t. You can, for example, just \includegraphics without a figure. Then the thing will just not have floating behaviour and you also might want captions and stuff, so an environment might be in order. But this need not be a figure. But if you don’t want all this, be aware that you might not need a figure at all and save yourself some trouble debugging.

I would suggest you probably go for figures anyway if it’s a long document where positioning might change dramatically after you first insert the picture, minipage or whatever. If, however, your result is pretty static and not a pages long document, you might just be better off leaving out the floats completely. Like, for example, in a poster, positioning isn’t really up for LaTeX to decide. You need it placed in a stable, reliable way and the way you want it and you exert lots of ‘control’ over the whole process.

Floats are better if you are dealing with a thing whose behaviour LaTeX is supposed to regulate acccording to its own best judgement. And as we all know, LaTeX’s judgement is pretty awesome. So this is a feature you might very well want to profit from in most cases. Also, you might want a \listoffigures. Or not. So think about that.

A little rant on “LaTeX is not doing what I want”

Beginners often get fed up with this behaviour because “LaTeX is not doing what I want”. This is probably due to the fact that you are using structures you think are supposed to do XYZ while they actually are programmed to do ABC. This is just a ‘misunderstanding’ between LaTeX and the user and can be remedied by additional knowledge about how some things work internally. So a general good bit of advice would be to look up how a structure you are trying to use is programmed to work internally. Most of the time, looking up the official documentation will already suffice. Probably it is supposed to do something completely different than what you thought it was or wanted it to. This is not LaTeX’s fault. It’s the fault of the user who doesn’t bother to look up those basic functionalities, so don’t blame LaTeX. But of course, if you’re still a beginner, this is a normal thing to do or expect. A common false assumption among programming novices. So don’t worry either. Next time you will know what to do.

A computer will do what you wrote down. Not what you meant. Even and especially, if the two are not the same thing 😉

The objective: placing things side by side

We will follow up with some examples of figures and minipages. By now, you are already informed what the differences are and can make an intelligent choice 😉

Case 1: The figure placed right here

The following is just a figure, but it will be forced to be placed right here (as indicated per the H). Using a small h really only means ‘here if it fits’. Only h! or H actually mean HERE!!!Also, read this great (lenghty) information on floats if you want to know more. Don’t forget to \usepackage{float} if you want to use the H. Edit: Thanks to Karl from LaTeX ref who informed me that h! basically only sometimes accidentally results in “place it HERE”. Use H for reliability.

So depending on your other needs (\listoffigures, etc.), you might as well have not used a floating environment since obviously, you did not intend for the thing to float.

\begin{figure}[H]
    \centering
     \begin{tikzpicture}
    \basesketch\bfseries
    \angles
    \end{tikzpicture}
    \caption{Sketch}
    \label{fig:Sketch}
\end{figure}

Case 2: Figure beside text with wrapfigure

The same thing like with minipage, basically, can be achieved with a wrapfigure, which you might need at some point too. This will make an image float beside text. On this, read the Overleaf tutorial.


\begin{wrapfigure}{R}{0.3\textwidth}
    \centering
    \begin{tikzpicture}[opacity=0.8, scale=0.5]
    \basesketch \angles
    \filldraw[draw=black, fill=lila, fill opacity=0.3] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- cycle;
    \filldraw[draw=black, fill=myblue, fill opacity=0.3] (A) -- (C) -- (K2) -- (K1) -- cycle;
    \end{tikzpicture}
    \caption{T\textsubscript{1} und T\textsubscript{2}}
    \label{fig:Triangles}
\end{wrapfigure}

Case 3: lifesaving minipages

First, I’ll explain the basic functionality of minipages and then issue some personal tips on how to use them 😉

Options

As you might have noticed, you have options when configuring your minipage: \begin{minipage}[adjusting]{width of the minipage} are the available ones. Meaning minipage has a specified alignment and a predetermined width. Although, you can use relative widths, of course. So it can be {3cm} or {0.3\textwidth} according to your needs. Notice however, that you cannot use 100% textwidth in total while still having everything aligned. Take off 0.03 in total to be sure. So all your minipages which are placed side by side cannot take up a total of 100% of the textwidth.

c = center, t = top and b = bottom are the alignment choices. c is default, I mostly use t. It can be a bit difficult to grasp what they actually do. They specify at which line the content gets aligned. So t means, the alignment will be oriented on the topmost, so the highest line.

Also, we can add more options [t][3cm][b] which additionally says that we have a fixed height of 3cm and the content will be aligned at the bottom. The (multiple) minipages themselves will be aligned at their tops.

Alignment of multiple minipages

Also, if you want multiple minipages aligned at their sides and not below eachother, you can’t have blank lines between them. Inside the minipage environments is no problem, but not following the first one before the second one, for example. See also Sasha Frank’s page and this.

When you check StackOverflow “How to use a figure inside a minipage” – the short answer is: You don’t!


\begin{figure}[ht]
  \begin{minipage}[b]{0.45\textwidth}
  \centering
    \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{img1}
    \caption{blabla}
    \label{fig:fig1}
  \end{minipage}
  \hspace{0.5cm}
  \begin{minipage}[b]{0.4\textwidth}
    \centering
    \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{img2}
    \caption{mycaption}
    \label{fig:fig2}
  \end{minipage}
\end{figure}

If you want to make two floats happily float, but in a row beside eachother, you can use the floatrow package, as detailed in this StackOverflow post.

Do I need a float now or what? Combining figure and minipage

If you don’t insist on having a float, people would probably go for minipage to make things sit aligned besides eachother and connected.

It is also not necessary to place your \includegraphics inside a figure, though a lot of beginners think so. Just put your images directly in a minipage if you don’t need floating behaviour. If you do – add a float. But not inside the minipage, this will cause an error. If you are confused about this, imagine a rubber duck floating in your bathtub. You cannot place it into a box because then it will sink. You can, however, make it carry a box on its back. So, this is basically the same thing with floats an minipages 😉

You cannot have a figure (=float) inside a minipage (non-floating box) since it will make the rubber duck sink. Don’t sink your rubber duck! Read up on it here (just to warn you, they don’t use rubber ducks for explanation, so don’t be disappointed).

And, by the way, it also doesn’t make sense to have float inside a fixed box. Float means, LaTeX decides where exactly to place elements. But if you put a fixed box, you have already made that decision. Nothing left for LaTeX to decide. Meaning LaTeX will go and sulk at you. If you need LaTeX to calculate where to put things and it is possible your document will change a lot, it’s better to use floats. If you want everything exactly where you want it, float will make you go crazy. You can put tikzpicture inside minipages. It’s confusing, I know.

And remember: If you don’t want the minipages to become “disconnected”, which is usually the case, make sure you don’t put an empty line after one of them. They should be “connected” in the code if you want them connected in the output.

Another example (snippet) from my personal CV template to visualize language skills. As you can see, you might be able to achieve what you want using a tabular as well.

cv-languages

This is how the code looks like:


\newcommand{\icon}[3]{\phantom{x}{#3\color{#2}#1}\phantom{x}}
%------------------- pictogram Fraction: pictoFraction
\newcommand{\pictofraction}[6]{%
\pgfmathparse{#3 - 1}\foreach \n in {0,...,\pgfma<span 				data-mce-type="bookmark" 				id="mce_SELREST_start" 				data-mce-style="overflow:hidden;line-height:0" 				style="overflow:hidden;line-height:0" 			></span>thresult}{\icon{#1}{#2}{#6}}%
\pgfmathparse{#5 - 1}\foreach \n in {0,...,\pgfmathresult}{\icon{#1}{#4}{#6}}%
}

\begin{minipage}[t]{\leftcolwidth}
\begin{tabular}{l | ll}
\textbf{German} & C2 & {\phantom{x}\footnotesize mother tongue} \\
\textbf{English} & C2 & \pictofraction{\faCircle}{blue}{3}{blue}{1}{\tiny}\\
   \textbf{Latin}  & C2 & \pictofraction{\faCircle}{blue}{3}{blue}{1}{\tiny}\\
   \textbf{French} & C2 & \pictofraction{\faCircle}{blue}{3}{blue}{1}{\tiny}\\
   \textbf{Ancient Greek} & B2 & \pictofraction{\faCircle}{blue}{3}{grey!30}{1}{\tiny}\\

\end{tabular}
\end{minipage}

There also is the subcaption package (subfigure or subfig are deprecated). Here, you can use sub-floats inside a single float. Here is an example of how to use it.

You can also put minipages inside a float, to make the whole thing float again. And that’s about it 😉

And just for your reference, I included the actual TikZ at the bottom of the post. Just in case you wanted it or whatever 😉

I really love minipages. They are my go-to thing for anything and everything. Sometimes even when there probably would be another (better) option available. Minipages rock! And so do you!

Best,

the LaTeX Ninja

The TikZ

\newcommand{\basesketch}{%
\scriptsize
\node[](Kreismittelpunkt) at (0,0) {};
\node[](K1) at (0,6) {};
\node[](K2) at (4,5) {};

\draw[] (Kreismittelpunkt) -- ++(0:5cm) node[](C){} -- ++(0:5cm) node[](K2){};
\draw[] (Kreismittelpunkt) -- ++(30:4cm)  node[](A){}  --  ++(30:2cm)  node[](B){}  -- ++(30:4cm) node[](K1){};
\draw[] (K2) -- (K1);
\draw[fill=myblue] (K2) circle (2.5pt) node[below=0.5em]{K\textsubscript{2}};
\draw[fill=myblue] (K1) circle (2.5pt) node[above=0.5em]{K\textsubscript{1}};

\draw[fill=myblue] (A) circle (2.5pt) node[above=0.5em]{A};
\draw[fill=myblue] (B) circle (2.5pt) node[above=0.5em]{B};
\draw[fill=myblue] (C) circle (2.5pt) node[below=0.5em]{C};
\draw[] (A) -- (C);
\draw[] (C) -- (B);
\draw[] (B) -- (K2);

% coordinates
\coordinate (K2) at (K2);
\coordinate (K1) at (K1);
\coordinate (A) at (A);
\coordinate (B) at (B);
\coordinate (C) at (C);

\draw[fill=myblue] (Kreismittelpunkt) circle (2.5pt) node[below=0.5em]{K};

% Alternative zu Arc zwischen zwei Punkten
\draw[-,draw=black!70] (K2) to[bend right=12] (K1);
\pgfresetboundingbox}

\newcommand{\angles}{%
\pic[draw=black!70,text=black!70, -,"$\alpha$"] {angle =A--C--Kreismittelpunkt};
\pic[draw=black!70,text=black!70, -,"$\delta$", angle eccentricity=1.3] {angle= B--C--A};
\pic[draw=black!70,text=black!70, -,"$\alpha$"] {angle = K2--C--B};
\pic[draw=black!70,text=black!70, -,"$\alpha$"] {angle = C--B--K2};

\pic[draw=black!70,text=black!70, -,"$\beta$"] {angle = A--B--C};
\pic[draw=black!70,text=black!70, -,"$\beta$"] {angle = K2--B--K1};

\pic[draw=black!70,text=black!70, -,"$\gamma$"] {angle = K1--K2--C};
\pic[draw=black!70,text=black!70, -,"$\gamma$"] {angle = B--K1--K2};

\pic ["\Huge $\cdot$", draw, -] {angle=C--A--B};
\pic ["\Huge $\cdot$", draw, -] {angle=Kreismittelpunkt--A--C};}

Buy me coffee!

If my content has helped you, donate 3€ to buy me coffee. Thanks a lot, I appreciate it!

€3.00

Regarding comments and contact info

Dear all,

apparently the LaTeX Noob is not alone to be a noob 😉

I just realized I had to approve your comments before they are published. Oops 😉 Will see to that more quickly in the future.

Also, I heard that some of you were not able to find contact information which maybe I might have messed up too 😉 I guess I just hadn’t really thought about having actual readers who want to contact me so far. And I am very happy that you exist and do wish to contact me! I will therefore add my contact info in the about section. Sorry, I am such a complete idiot not to have thought about this before 😉

Best and thanks again for all your positive feedback!